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Uploaded By: PRESIDENT on March 17th, 2014

Walter Charles Kilrea (Born February 18, 1909 in Ottawa, Ontario – Died July 3, 1992) was a Canadian professional ice Hockey left winger who played 9 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Philadelphia Quakers, New York Americans, Ottawa Senators, Montreal Maroons and Detroit Red Wings.

Kilrea played two years with senior Ottawa Montagnards before joining the Senators in 1929-30.

The next season he was loaned to the dreadful Philadelphia Quakers who won only four games all year.

Kilrea played for the New York Americans in the 1931-32 season, and the Montreal Maroons from 1932 to 1934.

Kilrea then played for the Windsor Bulldogs and Detroit Olympics of the IHL starting in 1934.

Kilrea was a key member of Detroit Red Wings back-to-back Stanley Cup championships in 1936 and 1937. He scored two goals, two assists in the 1935-36 playoffs, and two assists in the 1936-37 playoffs to help the Red Wings become the first U.S.-based team to win back-to-back Cups

Kilrea left the NHL after playing five games in 1937-38 season, then dressed for 44 contests with the Pittsburgh Hornets of the AHL. This was followed by a half dozen years with the Hershey Bears before retiring in 1944. Kilrea's best year during this period was 1942-43 when he led the AHL with 68 assists and 99 points and was named to the league's first all-star team.

Kilrea also coached the Philadelphia Rockets in the American Hockey League (AHL) from the 1947 to 1949, and the Johnstown Jets in the Eastern Hockey League (EHL) from 1950 to 1951.

The John B. Sollenberger Trophy was originally named after Wally Kilrea, who held the AHL's single-season scoring record when the award was instituted 1947–48. That season, the award was renamed in honour of its first recipient, Carl Liscombe, who broke Kilrea's scoring record.

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